MokoLoRa is member of LoRa alliance. We focus on offering LoRa solutions that are fully tailored to various Lorawan applications. Our LoRa devices can be applied in various industries. As below are those that can be commonly seen.

LoRaWAN Applications

LoRaWAN Products

MOKOLora LoRaWAN Bluetooth Gateway
MOKOLora LoRaWAN T&H Sensor
MOKOLora Lorawan gateway
MOKOLora LoRaWAN ContactTracker
MOKOLora Lorewan module

Why choose MokoLoRa for your LoRa project?

At MokoLoRa, we offer a variety of LoRaWAN products with exclusive qualities and benefits. They include:

Our LoRa Solutions and Capacities

MokoLoRa is part of the China LoRa application alliance. We focus on offering LoRa solutions that are fully tailored to your specific needs. Here are our capabilities and IoT LoRa solutions to various Lorawan applications:

Advantages of LoRaWAN

LoRaWAN® stands for a Low power wide area network meant for battery-operated wireless devices in an area network (regional, national or global)

Benefits of the LoRaWAN network

It can support 3 different classes of devices: Class A, B, and C

It's futuristic. The network is scalable hence can support future technology updates

Has a long battery life due to its low power usage quality

It has a very intelligent architecture

Covers long ranges and even penetrates thick building materials

It's cheap to implement. The hardware’s cost is affordable, and the spectrum is unlicensed

Supports remote control and access

With the LoRaWAN network, cloud applications are easily accessible

It's secure. The network transmits secure signals

LoRaWAN uses 868 MHz/915 MHz ISM bands which are available everywhere in the globe

Simple architecture makes it easy to install and use

One LoRa Gateway gadget can serve thousands of end devices

It's highly used for Internet of Things and M2M applications

Challenges of LoRaWAN network

Here are LoRaWAN Network challenges

1.Only suitable for applications that need a low data rate, i.e., up to about 27 Kbps, not more.
2.LoRaWAN network size is limited based on a parameter known as duty cycle hence limiting traffic served.
3.LoRaWAN is not suitable for real-time uses that have lower latency and bounded jitter needs.
4.LoRaWAN doesn’t guarantee message delivery because the packet error rates of more than 50% is common.
5.Implementation is costly and tiresome. You’ll need many products like gateways, servers, nodes, and others to establish a complete LoRaWAN ecosystem.

What is LoRa application

What is LoRaWAN applications

Long Range technology (LoRa) was started in France in 2009 by Nicolas Sornin and Olivier Seller, who ever since stopped at nothing to make it a reality. They derived this technique from the chirp spread spectrum tech (CSS). Semtech later acquired this wireless network technology in May 2012. The technology’s low power and long-range capabilities are now evident in multiple Lora applications like smart environments, smart cities, disease and pandemic control, smart homes, smart agriculture, smart utilities, smart metering, smart supply chain, and logistics, among many others we will discuss here. LoRaWAN applications are identifiable by their unique LoRa application id.

LoRA Specifications

Below are Long Range network specifications

Specifications

What LoRa can support

Frequency band

Uses ISM Bands: 433 MHz/868 MHz/780 MHz/915 MHz

Standard Availability

June 2015
LoRa network is being used in over 50 countries now

Cell Range

Rural areas-covers 15-20km
Urban areas-covers 2-5km

Cell Capacity

Cell can support up to 100 000 devices

Modulation

LoRa employs the Spread Spectrum Modulation with wideband linear FM signals.
This is able to provide at least 30 Decibel (dB) gain over FSK

Topology Support

Star Topolog

Battery life

15-20 years

IEEE Standard

EEE 802.15.4g

Physical Layer

Controls the frequency, modulation, signals, and power between devices and base stations

Specifications

What LoRa can support

Frequency band

Uses ISM Bands: 433 MHz/868 MHz/780 MHz/915 MHz

Standard Availability

June 2015
LoRa network is being used in over 50 countries now

Cell Range

Rural areas-covers 15-20km
Urban areas-covers 2-5km

Cell Capacity

Cell can support up to 100 000 devices

Modulation

LoRa employs the Spread Spectrum Modulation with wideband linear FM signals.
This is able to provide at least 30 Decibel (dB) gain over FSK

Topology Support

Star Topolog

Battery life

15-20 years

IEEE Standard

EEE 802.15.4g

Physical Layer

Controls the frequency, modulation, signals, and power between devices and base stations

How Does LoRaWAN Technology Work?

LoRaWAN network works on a point-to-multipoint protocol. Being a star network, LoRaWAN communicates similar to how a teacher speaks to the students (from one point to many points). Communication in LoRaWAN is two-way traffic. A LoRaWAN gateway (teacher) sends information to end nodes (students) and vice versa. When a gateway sends information to the nodes, one or more nodes then transmit the same information to the radio spectrum, where another gateway can pick up the information and send it to the cloud

How Does LoRaWAN Technology Work

LoRaWAN Network Fundamentals

There are four main LoRaWAN network fundamentals. They include:

End devices, Nodes, and Mote

LoRaWAN Gateways

LoRaWAN Network Server (LNS)

Application servers and Join servers

These are LoRa-based devices or gadgets embedded with a low-power communication object.

These are antennas that receive transmissions (LoRa modulated messages) from end devices and send it to the LoRa application server, which in turn sends it back to end devices.

It manages the whole network. It directs messages from end devices to the intended application and back.

LoRa application server free handles secures, manages, and interprets sensor app data while a join server manages the wireless activation when adding end devices to the network.

End devices, Nodes, and Mote

LoRaWAN Gateways

LoRaWAN Network Server (LNS)

Application servers and Join servers

These are LoRa-based devices or gadgets embedded with a low-power communication object.

These are antennas that receive transmissions (LoRa modulated messages) from end devices and send it to the LoRa application server, which in turn sends it back to end devices.

It manages the whole network. It directs messages from end devices to the intended application and back.

LoRa application server free handles secures, manages, and interprets sensor app data while a join server manages the wireless activation when adding end devices to the network.

End devices, Nodes, and Mote

LoRaWAN Gateways

LoRaWAN Network Server (LNS)

Application servers and Join servers

These are LoRa-based devices or gadgets embedded with a low-power communication object.

These are antennas that receive transmissions (LoRa modulated messages) from end devices and send it to the LoRa application server, which in turn sends it back to end devices.

It manages the whole network. It directs messages from end devices to the intended application and back.

LoRa application server free handles secures, manages, and interprets sensor app data while a join server manages the wireless activation when adding end devices to the network.

End devices, Nodes, and Mote

LoRaWAN Gateways

LoRaWAN Network Server (LNS)

Application servers and Join servers

These are LoRa-based devices or gadgets embedded with a low-power communication object.

These are antennas that receive transmissions (LoRa modulated messages) from end devices and send it to the LoRa application server, which in turn sends it back to end devices.

It manages the whole network. It directs messages from end devices to the intended application and back.

LoRa application server free handles secures, manages, and interprets sensor app data while a join server manages the wireless activation when adding end devices to the network.

LoRaWAN Network Fundamentals

LoRaWAN End Device Classes

There are 3 types of devices in LoRaWAN specifications: Class A, B, and C. The fundamental rule is that all LoRaWAN end devices must support Class A operation, but Class B and C are extensions to Class A specifications

Class A

Class B

Class C

Support point-to-multi-point communication between a device and a gateway.

Extends Class A by bringing in scheduled receiver windows for downlink messages from the LoRaWAN server.

Extend Class A by maintaining the receive windows open unless they are broadcasting / transmitting.

Class A

Class B

Class C

Support point-to-multi-point communication between a device and a gateway.

Extends Class A by bringing in scheduled receiver windows for downlink messages from the LoRaWAN server.

Extend Class A by maintaining the receive windows open unless they are broadcasting / transmitting.

Class A

Class B

Class C

Support point-to-multi-point communication between a device and a gateway.

Extends Class A by bringing in scheduled receiver windows for downlink messages from the LoRaWAN server.

Extend Class A by maintaining the receive windows open unless they are broadcasting / transmitting.

LoRaWAN End Device Classes

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